Legion Logo

Royal Canadian Legion
Branch 94

205 Empire, Greenfield Park,
Québec, Canada
J4V 1T9
450-466-0308
www.legion94.ca


 

Coverall Autumn 2014

 

 

 

Please click on a version of the Coverall which you would like to view.

 
Previous Issues
2015
Winter
2014
Winter Spring_Summer Autumn

2013
January April October

2012

January April July October

2011

January April July October

2010

Special Edition   October

 


To all visitors on this page,

As this appears to be Bruce's last edition of the Coverall, I have taken the time to publish it on this page, to allow for larger versions of his pictures. This version is also available as a PDF.

To Bruce,

Having worked on this web site for several years, starting as the "editor" of the online coverall, sometimes having to beg, barter or baffle people for new information, I can only commend you on your patience.

Your ability to compile content, pictures and layout is a talent from which I have learned (and occasionally plagiarized).

As to your wit; you have made me smile, laugh and, most importantly, contemplate what you offer to us, the readers.

I hope that you have a great time while you embark on new adventures (or were they projects?) to occupy both your time and talents.

In a word...

BRAVO

Rob


 

 

PRIDE IN OUR COMMUNITY

Members attending the June General Meeting voted to display the Greenfield Park flag above our entrance. Glenn Cantwell is shown mounting the newly procured flag. It will grace our entrance year round except for two weeks in November when it will be temporarily replaced by the Poppy campaign flag.


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 2
2014

 

HOPING EVERYONE HAD A GOOD SUMMER ALTHOUGH IT TOOK AWHILE TO ARRIVE.

MANY EVENTS WERE HELD ON FRIDAYS TO BRING FRIENDS TO THE HALL.

THANK YOU NAOMI AND HER CREW FOR BEING THERE TO HELP.

ON A NEGATIVE NOTE; WHERE WERE ALL OUR LEGION MEMBERS TO PARTICIPATE IN THE PARADE ON JULY 1ST FOR CANADA DAY.

GERRY CANTWELL, PRESIDENT.

 

 

PLUSIEURS ÉVÉNEMENTS ONT EU LIEU LES VENDREDIS AFIN D’INCITER LES AMIS À NOUS VISITER.

MERCI À NAOMI ET SON ÉQUIPE QUI ÉTAIT LA POUR NOUS AIDER.

SUR UNE NOTE NÉGATIVE; OÙ ÉTAIT PASSÉ LES LÉGIONNAIRES DE NOTRE FILIALE LORS DE LA PARADE DU CANADA LE 1ER JUILLET DERNIER

GERRY CANTWELL, PRÉSIDENT


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 3
2014

 

L’ÉTÉ S’ACHÈVE ET LES ACTIVITÉS RÉGULIÈRES SERONT BIENTÔT DE RETOUR À LA LÉGION.

CERTAINS PARMI NOUS ONT PASSÉ LEUR VACANCES AU CHALET ET D’AUTRES ONT DÉCIDÉ DE PROFITER DE LA BELLE TEMPÉRATURE SUE LE BALCON DE LA LÉGION.

LES DAMES AUXILIAIRES SONT LA POUR VOUS AIDER EN VOUS OFFRANT UN SERVICE DE TRAITEUR POUR LES FÊTES, ANNIVERSAIRES, MARIAGES ET FUNÉRAILLES.

NOS PRIX SONT COMPÉTITIFS ET IL NOUS FERA PLAISIR DE S’AJUSTER À VOS DEMANDES SPÉCIALES.

N’OUBLIEZ PAS DE VENIR À NOS BINGOS MENSUELS, LES DARDS DU VENDREDI SOIRS ET LES DARDS DU DIMANCHE APRÈS-MIDI.

NOUS PLANIFIONS QUELQUES BON REPAS ET LES DÉTAILS SERONT DISPONIBLES SOUS PEU.

EN ESPÉRANT QUE VOUS VOUS JOINDREZ AUX DIFFÉRENTES ACTIVITÉS ORGANISÉS POUR VOTRE PLAISIR.


MERCI
FRANCINE

 

THE SUMMER WILL BE SOON OVER AND REGULAR ACTIVITIES
WILL START AGAIN AT THE LEGION.

SOME OF US HAVE BEEN AWAY AT CAMP AND OTHERS STAYED AT HOME ENJOYING THE NICE WEATHER ON OUR OUTSIDE BALCONY.

THE LADIES AUXILIARY ARE THERE TO HELP YOU WITH THE CATERING OF YOUR EVENTS SUCH AS BIRTHDAY, WEDDING AND FUNERAL RECEPTIONS.

OUR PRICES ARE COMPETITIVE AND WE HAVE NO PROBLEM TO ADJUST TO YOUR SPECIAL REQUESTS.

DON’T FORGET TO COME TO OUR MONTHLY BINGOS, FRIDAY DARTS AND SUNDAY AFTERNOON DARTS.

A FEW GOOD MEALS ARE IN THE PLANNING AND DETAILS WILL BE POSTED ON THE BOARD.

WE HOPE THAT YOU WILL JOIN US IN THE ACTIVITIES ORGANIZED FOR YOUR ENTERTAINEMENT.

THANK YOU
FRANCINE CANTWELL

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 4
2014

It has been a quiet summer - not too much activity around the branch although the crib tournaments (much smaller attendance), crib league (greater attendance than normal as people with exercise classes, bingo and other winter activities joined us for crib during the summer), the Bridge and “500” clubs, the twice monthly trivia nights, and of course the Friday morning coffee group all kept humming along.

Something new this summer. Starting on July 25th a group of our enterprising ladies provided economical Friday night meals. On that night they served Chicken tournedos, potatoes and vegetables along with a dessert for $8. The following Friday $10 got you a hamburger steak, fried onions along with all the trimmings.

On August 8th they tried something a little different—a “You bring it, we cook it!” night. For those who didn't’t want to bring their own meat hamburgers were available for $2. For those who brought their own meat three salads, dessert and coffee were provided for $5. The following Friday it was pasta night (baked penne with pepperoni) with a Caesar salad, garlic bread, coffee and desert for $10. On August 22nd it was back to hamburger steaks.

The summer Friday night meals came to an end on August 29th. For ten dollars those attending had Chicken Parmesan, dessert and coffee.

On one of the evenings those who stayed around were treated to some easy listening as one of our members, Daniel Brossard, played the keyboard following the meal.

Thanks go to Naomi Malo and her team of volunteers (Anne Broden, Rose Quinn, Julie Brault along with James Durocher and friend Kaitlyn) on the bar b q for all their hard work organizing these suppers, to Shirley Miller for getting the word out and to all those who supported the suppers throughout the summer.

Other activities during the summer were the golf tournament in June (pages 6 & 7), Canada
Day (pages 12 & 13), the annual Ladies Auxiliary picnic at St. Anne's for the veterans (pages 24 & 25 )

SUNDAY SUPPERS

Starting on the last Sunday of September and on every second Sunday thereafter our branch manager and her team of volunteers will be preparing a Sunday meal. Details will be announced as the time approaches. To make sure you’re in the know ensure that the branch has an up-to-date phone number and /or e-mail address for you. If in doubt check with any one of the membership committee members (See Membership page 10)

REMEMBRANCE WEEKEND

Details are still being worked out but we can tell you that the Dinner/Dance on Saturday November 8th will include a full course meal with a glass of wine. Music will be provided by Duo Rockin and tickets will cost $15.00. The parade and Remembrance ceremonies at the cenotaph will be on Sunday November 9th. Full details about both events will be posted in the branch once they are finalized.

Bring the New Year in this year at Branch 94! – Join us for champagne cocktail & hors d’oeuvres followed by “Coq au vin” and all the trimmings and dance the night away with Maddy! Sandwiches will be served after midnight! Tickets are $25.00 each and will go on sale in November.

HONOURS AND AWARDS NIGHT

Mark your new 2015 calendar! January 24th is Honours and Awards Night. Starting at 7:00 P.M. the branch will recognize those who our members have nominated for outstanding achievement or service to the branch (see next page). Following the presentations the ever popular Greg Innis will be on hand to entertain and provide dancing music. Come on down! Join your comrades to honour those who have worked so hard to make branch life fun and entertaining and then stick around for an enjoyable evening.

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 5
2014

 

HONOURS & AWARDS
DISTINCTIONS HONORIFIQUES


DATE: AUGUST 2014 – AOÛT 2014


WANTED: NAMES OF MEMBERS WHO YOU FEEL DESERVE RECOGNITION FOR THEIR DEDICATION AND WORK DURING THE YEAR 2014


RECHERCHÉ: NOMS DE MEMBRES LESQUELS VOUS PENSEZ DEVRAIENT ÊTRE RECONNUS POUR LEUR IMPLICATION ET TRAVAIL AU COURS DE L’ANNÉE 2014

SUCCESS: WE RELY ON SUBMISSIONS FROM ALL MEMBERS
SUCCÈS : NOUS COMPTONS SUR LA COLLABORATION DE TOUS LES MEMBRES

AWARDS INFO: CONTACT ANDREA AT 450 672-3767 or snowhite@sympatico.ca,
JULIA AT 450-466-9361 OR JEAN AT 450-465-6895

RENSEIGNEMENTS: VEUILLEZ CONTACTER ANDREA A 450 672-3767 ou snowhite@sympatico.ca, JULIA AU 450-466-9361 OU JEAN AU 450-465-6895

FINAL DECISIONS: QUEBEC & DOMINION COMMANDS.

DÉCISIONS FINALES: DIRECTION DU QUÉBEC ET LA DIRECTION NATIONALE

DATE BUTOIR: AU PLUS TARD LE 12 OCTOBRE 2014
DEADLINE: NO LATER THAN OCTOBER 12, 2014


Classified ads
(Business card size - $25.00/4”x6” - 37.50/ 1/2 page - $50.00/ full page - $100.00)


 

GillesLabrie

Gilles Labrie, CD
Courtier immobilier
Cell: 514- 917-2479
Bur: 450-462-4414
Fax: 450-462-1509

Au plaisir de vous servir

Sutton

Groupe sutton action inc.
agence immobilière
2190, Lapinière
Brossard, QC

Pleased to serve you

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 6
2014

Annual Branch Golf Tournament
June 6, 2014

After waiting impatiently for Friday the 6th to arrive 13 plus foursomes teed off at Golf 2000 in Hemmingford for a fun outing that would end up back at Branch 94 in the evening for a Bar-B-Que steak supper during which tales of the morning’s events - the putt that ringed the cup, rolled out and stopped an inch from the lip; the long perfect drive up the left that hit a tree branch and bounced into the rough; the great shot out of the sand trap - and the many other tremendous shots made throughout the day were the major topics of interest.

There was also more than a little bit of ribbing about the shots that weren’t made. What follows are the golfers and their friends taking a break from their discussions to have their photos taken. It is quite apparent that they thoroughly enjoyed their outing.

 

 

 

Continued on Page 7


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 7
2014

Continued from Page 6

 

 

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page #8
2014

 

 

Mr. John Bennett is a British born Second World War veteran that served in the Royal Navy between 1940 and 1954. During WW2, he served mainly in the Mediterranean theater where his ship HMS Abercrombie hit sea mines two times but remained afloat.

HMS Abercrombie on which Mr. John Bennett served as an artificer during the Second World War.

Artificer = Skilled worker, somebody whose work requires manual skill

 

[Enlistment and training]

Well to be frank, at the time it was basically for a job. Again, times were still pretty hard there. One’s parents couldn't’t afford to keep you and it was, well actually, I picked up a brochure in the post office one day and it happened to deal with the Artificer Training Program [in the context of Mr. Bennett’s enlistment in the Royal Navy in January 1940]. And it just looked attractive to me, I knew I had to do something to sort of you might say support myself as it were. And so I actually decided to do that.

And it was actually quite difficult to get into the Navy in those days. I remember very well when I had to take an examination of typical sort of high school standards, you know in what, maths, science, I think probably a bit of English and that sort of thing. And I remember when they sent a list of all the results, including everybody that had taken it.

And there were about, as I recollect, something over 3 000 entries and they only took in the Naval Artificer Program, they only took I think not much more than 100 applicants. In the class I was in in one place there were actually about 70 of us got in. And I remember I just got in, I’d actually come 100th in this exam exactly, 100th I remember. Because of a few people being medically unfit, colour blind, you know little things like that; they were not taken in. And then so we then went into this rather intensive training program which lasted actually four years. It was originally a four and a half year course peace time, but they cut it back to four. But it was a very, very intensive and very good course actually, I must admit. In the Navy at that time, as they did in the Canadian as you probably know, they had engine room, electrical and ordinance artificers who were the basic tradesmen, and shipwrights and a few other trades as well. Because of course obviously, especially in the case of the British Royal Navy, when you could be away for a few years at a time you had to actually be able to fix, you know repair and that, a pretty wide variety of things. You had to pretty well be able to do, well I would say fix nearly anything. They at different times carried out quite sort of large jobs because they had to be done.

[Serving in the Mediterranean waters]

Actually, it was not very exciting. I came and joined the [HMS] Abercrombie [a British Royal Navy Roberts class monitor] shortly after it had been mined in the Italian theatre [as she was supporting the Allied landings near Salerno in September 1943]. I joined and spent, oh I don’t know, a few weeks, first few weeks working like hell getting the ship back into shape. They were – and then it might be something that probably may be of some interest to you, because they didn’t have available to them the facilities to properly repair the mine damage with plates, you know steel plating and that sort of thing; it had to all be done by the ships company and they just didn’t have that kind of equipment on board. They repaired it with concrete, concrete and timber, which worked all right up to a point.


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 9
2014

 

So anyway, we did finally get the ship repaired, ready for sea. We sailed to Malta and ammunitioned. We were about to go to carry out a bombardment, I think it was in the South of France planned. And on the way there we hit another two mines [on 21 August 1944]. So the plan was get back into Malta. We had to throw everything overboard that we could move to stay afloat, but we did manage. We had to be towed in because we’d lost our power as well. And then we did finally get in with about, I think about 12 inches of freeboard left. And I spent then the rest of the time on it practically repairing it again. So my time in the war consisted mainly of sweating.

And I will tell you this, this was very, very uncomfortable because the ship itself was a very shallow ship. You know, from the keel to the upper deck didn’t measure much. But because it was very broad it was put in a battleship dry dock. And when it was on the blocks I’d say the upper deck was a good dozen or 15 feet below the level of the dockside. And among other things, the meat locker had been blown open by the mine, or had been, you know,
burst open and the meat was all rotting, stank like hell.

But also, because they were going to carry out – and this was, as you may know, Malta dockyard, it was a very well equipped dockyard; it was capable of carrying out any kind of repairs, for a ship, the biggest, no question about that. So they spent a long time as well with pneumatic drills, drilling out, oh I don’t remember, it must have been, oh I don’t know, a couple hundred tons of concrete. It was all in a big compartment on the side of the ship, which more or less practically filled with concrete to plug up the mine damage. Because basically, on either side there are full length, I guess you call them blisters that reach out it must be about a dozen feet. And these are used as flotation chambers basically, that can either reduce or, if flooded, increase the draft of the vessel; so the convenience of the sailing conditions where they are.

And so basically the first mine had primarily blown a big hole through this, it was on the side. So they were able to do that with – practically fill this space up with concrete. It would be I guess about, I don’t know, 20 foot long or something of that sort of space. But as I say, it had all to be drilled out. And so when one was living on the ship in there, there were the pneumatic drills hammering away, drilling this out. It was hot. There were no bathroom facilities on board; one had to go up off the ship to them. And during the course of time practically everybody on board ended up with dysentery, so you can imagine it was a very unpleasant period


THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE TO YOUR COUNTRY, YOUR COMMUNITY AND THE LEGION .


WE ARE PROUD TO BE ASSOCIATED WITH YOU!


 

When we watch our children at play
When we safely walk our streets
And when we vote for our politician of choice
Let us remember that a price was paid
For this freedom and security we enjoy
So while the opportunity is here,
let us take a moment
to thank a vet and shake his hand
and thank him for all we have.


All Artificers were considerably better paid than other trades. An ERA 1st class was paid about twice what a seaman CPO received. Most Engine Room Artificers entered as apprentices and joined a ship at the 5th class level to complete the sea-phase of their training.

Electrical and Ordnance Artificers and some ERAs were hired as qualified Artificers and entered at the Artificer 3rd or 2nd Class level. They often had minimum naval background and were mostly valued for their technical expertise.


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 10
2014

By Cde. Shirley Miller

If you have moved be sure to let us know of any changes of address, phone numbers, e-mail addresses. If any of you would like to be included on our Branch e-mail list please send me an email shirleymiller@videotron.ca. The more people we have on this list the fewer people the telephone committee have to get in touch with.

Since our last issue the following members have initiated:


Deborah McGarr

 


Nicole Menard


2015 MEMBERSHIP CARDS WILL BE AVAILABLE STARTING SEPTEMBER 1ST
Dues have not changed - $35.00 for Veterans and $45.00 for everyone else.

 

EARLY BIRD CONTEST

Each year it is difficult to get all members to renew quickly. Renewals are time consuming especially when it becomes necessary to repeatedly remind members. We really do not want our comrades to miss out on the Legion Magazine or lose other benefits of membership. For the last two years we had “Early Bird” contests to encourage early renewal. They worked quite well so we will be doing so again this year. All members who renew before November 30th will have their names entered, then at the beginning of December three (3) names will be drawn and each will win $35.00.

 

DATES TO REMEMBER


November 30th Early Bird ends
January 1st Date by which dues should be paid
January 31st End of Grace Period
February 1st Entry to Branch denied and all membership privileges lost.

 

PAYING YOUR MEMBERSHIP

If you come to the Branch to pay your dues and no Membership Committee member is there, you may leave your cheque with a bartender. Your new membership card will then be left behind the bar for you to pick up. Please make your cheques payable to RCL Branch 94. If you are paying by post dated cheque please include a note to that effect.

PLEASE REMEMBER THE BARTENDERS CANNOT ACCEPT CASH
CHEQUES ONLY.

Should you have any questions regarding membership please contact any member of the executive or one of the members of the Membership Committee.

Shirley Miller
 
450-923-5610
Francine Cantwell
 
450-465-7644
Bruce Robertson
 
450-671-1108
Julia Shapcott
 
450-466-9361

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 11
2014

Equipment Loan Program

Branch 94 provides health equipment to individuals dealing with illness or injury. Our Short Term Loan Program alleviates the pressures that come along with injury or illness; assists members and there families with mobility issues, allows people to return home from hospital earlier, and recuperate in the comfort of their own home.

For anyone who needs medical equipment to live safely at home, the Legion provides aids such as:

Wheelchairs
Walkers
Bath seats and benches
Crutches and canes

For further information contact Fred Goodall at 450-465-2782.


WE WILL REMEMBER THEM

 



DON GIROUX

 


JOSEPH (JEFF) NARCISSE POIRIER



JOHN GEORGE (BUCK) WELLS

 

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 12
2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 13
2014

 

And after the parade and a stroll through the park...

 

getting together with friends to continue the celebration

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 14
2014

 

Dear Comrade,


We would like to remind you that this year’s Poppy Campaign runs from October 31 to November 11, 2014.

The Poppy Campaign is the foundation of our Remembrance Program. We provide Canadians with the opportunity to Remember by providing them with a Poppy and to participate at Remembrance Day services.

Our Poppy volunteers will be located throughout the community to solicit funds towards our Campaign. Because of our volunteers’ hard work, generous donations were made to help our veterans, the Charles-Lemoyne Hospital and many other community organizations. (see below)

In October one of our team leaders will be calling you and we look forward to your participation. If you would like to volunteer, contact Fred Goodall at 450-465-2782.

The Poppy Campaign Committee

R.C.E.L. Fund which helps our Veterans in the Caribbean
$ 500.00
Ogilvy’s ChristmasTree Fund, provides gifts for Ste. Anne’s Hospital patients
$ 500.00
Music Trust Fund, provides entertainment for the patients at Ste Anne’s Hospital
$ 500.00
QuebecCommaService Bureau
$ 500.00
Items 1 – 4 are a yearly request from Provincial
 
H.O.P.E( Local community food cupboard)
$1,000.00
Bursaries for Greenfield Park graduating H.S. Students (4 @ $300)
$1,200.00
Greenfield Park Christmas Baskets
$1,000.00
Meals on Wheels
$1,000.00
Donation to the Greenfield Park Cadet Corps 1979 (For their support during the Poppy Campaign)
$ 500.00
Defibrillator Branch 94
$1,621.20
Charles Lemoyne Hospital Special Equipment
$5,000.00
Ste Anne’s Veterans Hospital Special equipment
$5,259.00
 
Total
$18,580.20
 

 

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 15
2014

Looking Back

A collection of items and photographs that have appeared in the Legion Magazine over the years

 

 

November/December 1997

Greenfield Park L.A. presented $5,000 to the branch.

The branch honored janet Murphy for her promotion of the Legion over the past 35 years.

 

May/June 1988

 

September/October 1999

 

March/April 2000

 

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 16
2014

May/June 2000

 

 

 

 

Organizers and officials pose after a seniors fair day organized by Greenfield Park, Que., Branch. Various speakers represented medicine, police, fire securty and veterans affairs at information sessions. Seen are (rear from left) organizer Andrea Main, First vice Joe Rogers, President Ray Langstaff; (sitting, from left) command representative Anne Cameron and podiatrist nurse Lise Lalancette from Ste-Anne's Hospital in Ste-Anne de Bellvue.

 

November/December 2000

 

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 17
2014

 

January/February 2001

 

 

 

 

 

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 18
2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 19
2014

 

 

 

Guess they were right when they said FUN DARTS were relaxing


 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 20
2014
 

 

We thank Frank Conabree for submitting this item. Judging by the first sentence it appears somewhat dated. Nevertheless with Remembrance Day coming up it highlights exactly what it is that we take time to remember as well as giving us a sense of pride in what Canadians have accomplished through the years. It is worth the read.

 

Salute to a brave and modest nation - Kevin Myers, 'The Sunday Telegraph' LONDON :


Until the deaths of Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan , probably almost no one outside their home country had been aware that Canadian troops are deployed in the region.

And as always, Canada will bury its dead, just as the rest of the world, as always will forget its sacrifice, just as it always forgets nearly everything Canada ever does.. It seems that Canada 's historic mission is to come to the selfless aid both of its friends and of complete strangers, and then, once the crisis is over, to be well and truly ignored.


Canada is the perpetual wallflower that stands on the edge of the hall, waiting for someone to come and ask her for a dance. A fire breaks out, she risks life and limb to rescue her fellow dance-goers, and suffers serious injuries. But when the hall is repaired and the dancing resumes, there is Canada, the wallflower still, while those she once helped glamorously cavort across the floor, blithely neglecting her yet again.


That is the price Canada pays for sharing the North American continent with the United States , and for being a selfless friend of Britain in two global conflicts.


For much of the 20th century, Canada was torn in two different directions: It seemed to be a part of the old world, yet had an address in the new one, and that divided identity ensured that it never fully got the gratitude it deserved.


Yet it's purely voluntary contribution to the cause of freedom in two world wars was perhaps the greatest of any democracy. Almost 10% of Canada 's entire population of seven million people served in the armed forces during the First World War, and nearly 60,000 died. The great Allied victories of 1918 were spearheaded by Canadian troops, perhaps the most capable soldiers in the entire British order of battle.


Canada was repaid for its enormous sacrifice by downright neglect, it's unique contribution to victory being absorbed into the popular memory as somehow or other the work of the 'British.'


The Second World War provided a re-run. The Canadian navy began the war with a half dozen vessels, and ended up policing nearly half of the Atlantic against U-boat attack. More than 120 Canadian warships participated in the Normandy landings, during which 15,000 Canadian soldiers went ashore on D-Day alone.


Canada finished the war with the third-largest navy and the fourth largest air force in the world. The world thanked Canada with the same sublime indifference as it had the previous time.


Canadian participation in the war was acknowledged in film only if it was necessary to give an American actor a part in a campaign in which the United States had clearly not participated - a touching scrupulousness which, of course, Hollywood has since abandoned, as it has any notion of a separate Canadian identity.


So it is a general rule that actors and filmmakers arriving in Hollywood keep their nationality - unless, that is, they are Canadian. Thus Mary Pickford, Walter Huston, Donald Sutherland, Michael J. Fox, William Shatner, Norman Jewison, David Cronenberg, Alex Trebek, Art Linkletter and Dan Aykroyd have in the popular perception become American, and Christopher Plummer, British.


It is as if, in the very act of becoming famous, a Canadian ceases to be Canadian, unless she is Margaret Atwood, who is as unshakably Canadian as a moose, or Celine Dion, for whom Canada has proved quite unable to find any takers.


Moreover, Canada is every bit as querulously alert to the achievements of its sons and daughters as the rest of the world is completely unaware of them. The Canadians proudly say of themselves - and are unheard by anyone else - that 1% of the world's population has provided 10% of the world's peacekeeping forces.


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 21
2014

 

Canadian soldiers in the past half century have been the greatest peacekeepers on Earth - in 39 missions on UN mandates, and six on non-UN peacekeeping duties, from Vietnam to East Timor, from Sinai to Bosnia.


Yet the only foreign engagement that has entered the popular non-Canadian imagination was the sorry affair in Somalia , in which out-of-control paratroopers murdered two Somali infiltrators. Their regiment was then disbanded in disgrace - a uniquely Canadian act of self-abasement for which, naturally, the Canadians received no international credit.


So who today in the United States knows about the stoic and selfless friendship its northern neighbour has given it in Afghanistan ?


Rather like Cyrano de Bergerac , Canada repeatedly does honourable things for honourable motives, but instead of being thanked for it, it remains something of a figure of fun. It is the Canadian way, for which Canadians should be proud, yet such honour comes at a high cost. This past year more grieving Canadian families knew that cost all too tragically well.


Lest we forget.


20/12/2011
BRAVO !!!!!


It happened in a Metro station in Montreal ...........


There were protesters on the concourse handing out pamphlets on the evils of Canada. I politely declined to take one.


An elderly woman was behind me getting off the escalator and a young (20-ish) female protester offered her a pamphlet, which she politely declined. The young protester put her hand on the woman's shoulder as a gesture of friendship and in a very soft voice said, 'Lady, don't you care about the children of Iraq ?'


The elderly woman looked up at her and said, 'Honey, my father died during World War I, I lost my husband in World War II, I lost a son in Korea, and a grandson in Afghanistan. All fought and died so you could have the freedom to stand here and bad mouth our country. If you touch me again, I'll stick this umbrella up your ass and open it.'


...............God Bless Canada!!!


 

 


 

DAMMIT I’M MAD
is
DAMMIT I’M MAD
spelled backwards

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 22
2014

Francine Cantwell
President Ladies auxiliary

Many years ago there were two picnics each year. In addition to visiting Ste. Annes we welcomed the Veterans to the Branch for food, drink and activities. In those years the hall was always crowded. One or two busloads of veterans, nurses and attendants from Ste. Annes along with the many members who came to the hall to help serve and entertain the veterans ensured this.

The bartenders knew how to rim the glasses and pour mostly sodas in a supposedly rum and coke. We had the Irish and/or highland dancers, skits. standup comedians and, most importantly, lots of ladies to dance with the veterans.

Because of the logistics and the manpower required to transport and monitor so many veterans the authorities at Ste. Annes determined that there should be only one picnic each year. It was mutually agreed that it would be safer and more convenient for the patients if they were held at the hospital.

So in recent years early each August our Ladies Auxiliary make sandwiches, prepare gift bags and assemble picnic baskets. Then, usually on the first Saturday of the month they hire a bus and with a group of volunteers, load up the goodies, travel to the hospital and once there, assisted by other branch members who had made their own way to the hospital, unload everything and get ready to entertain the veterans. Everyone, the veterans, branch members, hospital staff and in the past few years the Vietnam Veterans Association whose visits have coincided with ours, always seems to enjoy the outing.

This year, as seen in the photos on the following page, was no different. The theme was Hawaiian. Mr. Louis Lamarche, the Recreation Coordinator had ensured that the auditorium was well decorated and Greg Innis made sure that the music was appropriate. Loretta Julien got the girls guide to do individual bag of goodies Hawaiian style and Shirley Chaif once again made sugar free cookies that were the first things out of the bag.

Unfortunately we were told that Ste-Anne’s Hospital will be turned over to the Quebec Government next April and that they are already talking about cutting expenses. Many of the workers (nurses, doctors, etc.) have been notified that their jobs have been eliminated. Veterans will have to go to Place Bonaventure to meet with specialized doctors. By 2015 half the hospital will have been converted to a regular hospital for the people living in the area.

It is sad to see this change when there are so many young veterans that could benefit from their services. Hopefully, we will be able to do another picnic next August and bring some joy to our veterans.

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 23
2014

 

To see more of the color pictures from this page, please download the PDF version of this coverall. Technical difficulties and time constraints did not allow for all of the pictures to be displayed in this section.

 

 

 

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 24
2014

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 22,2014
6PM TO 7:30PM

HELPING RESIDENTS OF GREENFIELD PARK
CHRISTMAS BASKET FUND RAISER

 

SPAGHETTI SUPPER
$10.00
CAESAR SALAD
SPAGHETTI MEAT SAUCE
ROLLS, BUTTER
CAKE
TEA/ COFFEE

 

FOR TICKETS PLEASE SEE:
ANDY WALTER 450-656-4361
FRANCINE CANTWELL 450-465-7644
WADE WILSON 450-656-0922

ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION
205 EMPIRE
GREENFIELD PARK
450-466-0308

 

 

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 25
2014


Idle thought no. 1—”Cookie, Cookie, lend me you comb” just crossed my mind, no idea why!

In the last issue I expressed the hope that someone would step forward to assume the editorship of the Coverall. Unfortunately no one has, so as promised, I will put this issue together. I will not repeat the reasons for my decision to relinquish the editorship but I will add one more.

At the passing of my mother four years ago and my father last year I came into possession of items I had not known existed. On my mothers side there was a small packet of letters written by her father during WWI. Her father never made it back to England. In addition to the letters there was a scroll, reproduced below along with enclosure note from King George V. They were still in the mailing tube in which they were received postmarked 30 Dec.1919 .

 

In addition to the scroll there was a framed medal. The medal looks like an oversized English penny. It measures roughly five inches in diameter. Around the outer edge is inscribed “HE DIED FOR FREEDOM AND HONOVR’ The only other inscription is his name. It is pictured at the top of the next page.


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 26
2014

On my fathers side there is nothing quite as dramatic, There was an album with some obviously very old photographs. The dresses on some of the ladies look Victorian, which provides a clue to their age. Unfortunately with the exception of some photos taken when my father was still a child there are no names. The challenge will be to discover who these people are. In the months before he left us my father revealed that his father had told him that the original family name was Robson; that it was changed to Robertson when the family relocated to the lowlands. Lowlanders apparently held highlanders in rather low esteem and Robson was a Highland name. An incidental bit of information is that as a result of starting a family tree on Ancestry.com. I received a communication from a woman in Vancouver. This led to an exchange of e-mail messages and information she had uncovered which seemed to substantiate that there were Robsons in our family tree. The point I am trying to make is that all these bits and pieces of information provide me with enough fuel to initiate a project I have always wanted to tackle - a family history.

Recently on the internet there was an item about an American celebrity claiming to be a 23rd cousin, twice removed, of Prince George. I haven’t the foggiest notion of how one figures this out - perhaps by using Einstein’s theory of relativity! In my family I know one second cousin, not too far removed. However I have no intention of going this far afield. I also have a first cousin whom I have never met and others I have not seen since childhood. Each of my cousins have children of their own and in some cases their children are parents. These people are all related in some way to my grandchildren, who at this point have no idea that they even exist and it is highly unlikely that they will ever meet. Nevertheless they should have the opportunity of learning the outer boundaries of the immediate family in addition to family history.

Information is accumulating. I want to search for more and time is growing short. This information and any discoveries I may make should all be consolidated in one place. I am entering the Golden Aches, er Ages, a stage of life where one never knows what lies around the corner. Consequently I want to record what I have learned thus far for my children and grandchildren. This is where I want to concentrate my efforts. I have in mind a scenario of how it will all lay out. The challenge will be to find the time to get it done.

I enjoyed the time spent chronicling events over the past 15 years. In doing so I hope that others too have shared my enjoyment. In any case there is a recorded history of the activities and the members who have populated Branch 94 during this time. Now I want to concentrate my efforts elsewhere.

The door is not being closed. If no one steps forward to assume responsibility for the COVERALL I may at some time in the future undertake to edit another one. However I make no promises when or if this will occur. As a final comment I would like to thank the members who have provided material over the years—Shirley Miller, who could always be relied upon to provide a recap of Ladies Auxiliary activities and Membership information. Andrea Main, Roma Zakaib, Gerry Geurin and Normand Simard who could be counted on to provide photographs and to the late Dick Teague who over the years provided much of Branch 94’s history and numerous other items for consideration. There are, of course, many others who in one way or another provided material to use. To all I am grateful for the opportunity to serve in a small way.

THANK YOU ALL VERY MUCH!

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 27
2014

Bits and Pieces From Here & There

 

Some of our ladies attended a tea party at St. Mary's Church in support of cancer research. This is the 9th year that they have done so. Ed Toy (a branch member and coordinator of our trivia nights), Elizabeth Bradshaw and other parishioners participate in the two day 60K walk from the Olympic stadium to the West Island.

 

-Thanks to the hard work of Shirley Miller and Beverly Morley the raffle tickets sold to help cover the costs of the L.A.’s annual picnic for the veterans at St. made a profit of $948. The prize winners were;

Cde. Barfoot - $100 Champlain mall gift card,
Cde. S. Miller - Flower cart
Cde. Ron Brittain - $50 SAQ gift card

 


 

- At the June 25 General Meeting Poppy Trust Chairman Jack Gammon and campaign coordinator Fred Goodall presented a cheque to branch president Gerry Cantwell enabling the branch to purchase a defibrillator. Hopefully this is an item we will never have to use. But if this should ever prove necessary the defibrillator is now located.


 

Julia Shapcott and Andrea Main who worked on the parade and in the Legion setting up for the post parade festivities taking a break to enjoy the parade.

 

You just never know what will happen in or about our branch . Here the RED HATTERS drop in for one of
our Senior Lunches.


Hi,,, The Country Gentlemen will be gathering on the 4th. Sunday of each month,, I believe that's the 28th of Sept. Lewis & Paul are away,, and Jim is on the road,, but Rick will confirm that, The rest of us just show up and have fun ! Thank You for ALL the great work !!!!!!!

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 28
2014

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 29
2014

 

 

 

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 30
2014

 

 

 

 


AUTUMN ISSUE
Page # 31
2014

 

 

 

 


 

This edition of the Coverall is a copy of the printed version, which is initially posted at the branch and published by Bruce Robertson.

Changes to the original version of the Coverall may have been made in layout and format to allow for web publication. Any errors to, or omissions from, the original printed version are solely the fault of the volunteer(s) who brought this version to the web.

Anyone willing to volunteer some time to maintaining this web site would be greatly appreciated.

  
 
   
   
   
   
   
Legion Logo
Branch Logo

 

Home   About Us    History   Past Presidents   Last Post    Ladies Auxiliary    Hall Rental    Membership   Coverall   Map  

© Copyright 2000-2016